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think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
cross. this was profitable and, therefore, of interest. it's even a science fiction story, because what we're doing here really when you come right down to it is the meeting of two alien civilizations after 70 years of the soviet period. the oil industry, in particular, grew up in almost complete isolation from the waste, and this is virtually a unique place. we have other places where oil industries are run by national oil companies, but in almost every case -- in fact, in every case, these industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 1920s on at any rate for all practical purposes the oil industry was home grown and developed its own culture, its own civilization even as the soviet union did with its own language and its own culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that of a people that decided that capitalism didn't work, so it's as though they all piled into a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a completely different civ
of the house committee on science, space and technology. that's true. and then there was a theory that romney just wasn't a very good candidate. didn't say things people understood, didn't connect the people very well have a somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan, his home state that primary can set victories for the a rate and michigan. the actual quote was i love this day. it seems right here. the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees that please. no trees at such a perfect height as thieves. for me i cannot ever be a piece with trees that grow no higher than one sneeze or two tall trees that splinter entries. wisconsin sure has bragging rights and cheese in california is rich and kidneys in colorado this week to take your skis. connecticut of course has lyme disease. [laughter] and none of these semi-prepared to sneeze, but here we have the perfect height of trees. [laughter] [applause] and according to that theory, romney just wasn't a very good candidate. they should've nominated somebody else. it is also the theory that there were demographic
colbert's mind last night. now neil, one of the most popular science writers of our time takes us for a wild ride through the universe here on "the cycle." >> you have said i'm related to a fish, right? >> oh, yeah. the challenge here is taking it to rocks and planets and stellar processes and the big bang. itsd the unity of all physical entities in the world. >> can you get me $5 worth of whatever it is? sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unu
much easier than it appears, it's not rocket science? >> and not only maybe not rocket science but ends up being good. in texas, 6% unemployment and that is attributed to the energy boom. they allowed it to happen. on the federal level we are not allowing it to take place. in iowa they have a surplus and the fours they have an unemployment rate. so you can make people's lives better. it makes sense to people in a common sense level but in the federal area not so much. >> neil: i get a lot of e-mail. we had ron johnson on and got heated on and where is your backbone in spending cuts. you have folks saying, you have to realize elections have consequences. the president won. this to say beyond justifying tax hikes, it justified no spending cuts. i don't think that is the americanss saw it. they won't see the math here that hurts democrats and republicans alike if something isn't done? >> here is the question i think the president knows well that this is the question. is california the model we're going to follow? they are $165 billion to $335 billion in debt. they say they might have a sur
asked questions. that's what we do. journalism isn't a perfect science of course, but to suggest it somehow means the shooting didn't happen, that 20 schirn weren't killed, that families didn't suffer and weren't still suffering is beyond comprehension and deeply offensive to many. tracy isn't the only one spinning conspiracy theories. on youtube and online this is a website i don't want to mention because i don't want to give them extra traffic. some of them are claiming 6-year-old emilie parker didn't die. they're pointing to a dress she was wearing in a shooting. it's the same dress that emily's little sister wore when president obama met with families. these conspiracy theorists are saying that's actually emily on president obama's lap. it's a sick ening claim, obviously, there's no other word for t. there's another one on another website. they use an interview that noah pozner's mother did. here's some of that interview. watch the conversation i had with her first. >> how are you holding up? i mean -- >> most of the time i'm -- i'm kind of numb, you know? i think about -- an
in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education. state universities for example are being decimated. so if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth in the future? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word, invest became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about it in a fairly sophisticated manner. some in the government. some the private sector, each on their own and some jointly. that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
to the science and space technology program he was involved whether they will try to pick up some sort of new copyright enforcement has yet to be seen. >> host: did you see a policy coming forward again? >> whether there will be some sort of effort to have some kind of copyright law mind, i think it is a possibility. but i think a lot of lawmakers were a little frightened by the backlash for that. i think there is a movie industry and the recording industry is looking for smaller issues that they can push. >> host: lee terry is taking over for cliff stearns. on the energy and commerce committee, is that right? >> no, he is taking over the position that mary bono mack had and he will be the vice chair of the commerce committee. it will be interesting to see how and whether she tries to assert her authority. she has actually told me that she is interested in tackling something related to piracy. but i would agree that it's very unlikely. all members are extremely wary of trying to enact laws of technology that they perhaps have an expertise on. and that they don't understand all the ramificatio
in the real world but the science has been modeled and looks like it would actually work. the trick is getting the salt particles to the very particular size and very large quantity that would be necessary to do this on a scale that actually matters. >> so how close are we to that actually happening? i mean seems like it's out of a science fiction movie. >> it does and i should be very clear that the people that are working on in in silicon valley, they have no intention of actually taking these machines out to ocean beach and starting to test it on their own. they are just focused on working in the lab, developing the technology that they think will be capable of doing it and they think they are pretty close. they would then turn it over to academic or government researchers to decide what to do. >> and that brings us into the area where you have -- if you have this technology, if it goes to academic or federal researchers, you need federal or academic money to back this and that will bring a debate in, won't it? because there's some concern about should you be coming up with measures that de
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen, we are performing excerpts from composer naverez, our christmas, and our soloist tonight is the amazing jimmy castvo. [ applause ] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> bravo. ♪ [ applause ] ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] [ cheers ] ♪ ♪ ♪
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
-old morgan aldridge describes what she saw in her first period science class this morning when she says a classmate walked in with a shotgun and started shooting. >> didn't like he was aiming for anybody for certain at the time. but we looked back and the kid made a joke that got shot, he said, dude, i got shot. we thought it was just something fake. >> reporter: she says at first she thought it was a joke or possibly a drill. then she says she saw blood on the classmate's shoulder. >> he was kind of bloody. and everyone ran to the back of the classroom except for a few of us. we stayed at our desks. >> reporter: aldridge said the gunman came in intending to shoot one specific student. >> the kid was saying i'm only looking for this person, just one person. and that kid kind of popped his head up behind where he was hiding and said i'm sorry. and then he kept saying i'm sorry. >> reporter: she said the teacher then convinced the boy to lower the weapon and the security guard arrived and he was taken into custody. several hours later tearful reunions
in science, technology, and math. >>> would you imagine that one fish could be sold for close that $2 million? >> the big fish? well, it happened in japan. the big ticket bluefin tuna weighed just under 490 pounds. it was bought by the head of a popular sushi chain in japan for a record price of $1.76 million. the owner says the fish is big enough to make 10000 pieces of sushi. but just to break even he'd have to charge $176 dollars a plate. it's a story the conservationists probably don't like. they believe the bluefin is in jeopardy. >> they know that because of the scales? >> you can get puns in on saturday? >>> the illiniy looking for first big win against the top 10. >> highlights and more next in sports. ded >>> rich is here with sports. all this talk about notre dame, we can't forget illinois though. >> the illini college basketball. they quickly shook off the loss to purdue winning convincingly over ohio state state at assembly hall. two old partners going at it. thad matta and groce. illinois pulled away in the second half. abrams h
as it sounds. we have a reporter who is live. >> it is a good idea. parents say that science is that even a little more sleep can improve student health and education. the school board wonders if this idea will and to be expensive. >> seven 17 a.m. that is when school begins and anne arundel county. according to research, it is the early as wake up all in the state. heather leads the group start school later, which now has chapters in many states. she is petitioning to the school board with signatures to let students sleep in a bit longer. >> we know the health impacts of sleep approbation that the kids are experiencing. it is quite experience. some of the long-term impacts are not know. >> bus pickup times can be as early as i 50 a.m. that is dark in the winter. that is a safety issue. >> no student should be on a bus earlier than 7 a.m. and not earlier than 8 a.m. in a classroom. dr. owen says it is well- documented that in adolescents body chemistry affects their sleep. >> there is a natural shift in wake and sleep time that is associated with problems of teenagers getting to sleep muc
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
. bjorn lomborg worries about air pollution and global warming but says the coverage is junk science? >> it is and very harmful. it tells us 5 million people will die every year because of global warming. they fail to say it has nothing to do with global warming. just the 3 million people was from indoor air pollution. if anything it is the opposite. lots of poor people in the third world burn cardboard or dong and they die from burning fat inside their houses. maybe give them cleaner fuels our fossil fuels there will be better. they tell us the wrong story and the wrong solution. john: the particulates kill people. global warming is theoretical. >> they say cut carbon emissions to help people dying from air pollution. no. don't burn down inside your house. we don't think of it because it was 100 years ago we had dirty fuels. john: in the west. but they pander to talk about the big storms caused by global warming. here is out for. >> this storm was related to global warming. the second ones in 100 years storm within 14 months. john: 2012 was below average the hurricanes go up and dow
of it that we're going to stay on top. >>> up next, how to avoid diet pitfalls with real science. coming back with dr. robert lustig right after this. i'm up next, but now i'm singing the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! >>> over the last few months, you've probably heard me talk a lot about the importance of limiting sugar in your diet. and a lot of that knowledge is based upon the work of dr. robert lustig. oo he's the author of this new book called "fat chance." you're not talking about just adding to your waistline or pounds to your body. you're talking about something in the way that these substances behave in the body. >> that's right. we're not talking about pounds. i think that the worst thing you can do is get on the scale. when you get on the scale, you're measuring four compartments at once. bone, more is better. muscle. more is better. subcutaneous or big butt fat, if you will. more is better. in fact, people with larger amounts of subcutaneous fat have longevity. and belly fat. more
, but at the end of the game, is it really worth it? >> reporter: seau's family donated his brain to science. the national institutes of health found evidence of shrunken and hardened brain cells like these, tell-tale signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. >> all concurred with the diagnosis of cte. >> reporter: it can be a lethal chain of events. chronic blows to the head, including concussions, can cause cte. the symptoms include dementia, mood swings and depression severe enough to lead to suicide. >> the combination of depression and lack of impulse control probably contributes to the suicide that we see in this group of individuals. >> reporter: researchers have documented 50 football players stricken by cte. 35 of them nfl players. six high school players. >> cte is not being seen in individuals without repetitive head injury in our experience. >> reporter: today's revelation about the toughest among them has some in the nfl questioning their own health. >> the times i do forget things, the sleepless nights you may have, you start to wonder, are you down that path towards cte? >> r
snowshoes on. >>> moving science and history. the massive project ahead for a bay area institution. stay with us. ♪ secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. >>> san francisco's famed science museum has officially started one very big move. across town today, crews started transporting 450 exploratory exhibits. the museum is moving from the palace of fine arts to its new home at pier 15, which is three times larger than its current location. the move is expected to take a few weeks to complete. the grand opening will be in april. >>> with the exploratory on the move, what happens to the old home of the palace of fine arts? that is now on the market if you're interested. talk about amazing location. the building is 80,000 square feet of space and the rent will set you back about $490,000 a year. city officials say a search for a long-term tenant could take a year or two. >> perfect for weddings, that's all i have to say. >>> what
engineers to hire. britain's universities lead the world in teaching science and engineering and yet we have an annual shortfall of 60,000 graduates and nine of ten post graduate students in those subjects are from overseas. what more can we do? >> my hon. friend is entirely right and we need to tackle this problem at every level, making sure we are teaching math and science and stem subject probably and there are signs the number of people taking those subjects are increasing. we need to make sure our universities are properly funded and make sure that is the case but we also need to raise the profile about engineering and that is one of the reasons we introduced the 1 million pound prize, for engineering. that combined with 34 university technologies will make sure we train engineers we need for the future. >> it is more important than ever in northern ireland that we continue moving forward away from violence and create stability and i am sure the prime minister will agree to me that food participation and support for the political and democratic process by everybody so people's issues ca
to the program for international student assessment, the u.s. now ranks 14th in reading. 17th in science, and 25th in mathematics. that is not acceptable. those are not grades we want to put on the national refrigerator. the time for action is now. i want to thank delegate kirk thompson and the chairman of the all student campaign. they have created a number of proposals i will announce this year. it starts with the idea that great students and schools make great citizens. a great teacher, like my sister, makes all the difference in the world in the life of a young person. we need to recruit, retain, and reward excellent teachers, and then treat them like the professionals that they are. [applause] first i am proposing giving teachers their first state- supported pay raise since 2007, and my budget limits provide $58 million for a 2% pay raise. the education fairness act will streamline the bureaucratic grievance procedure to benefit both teachers and principals. we will extend the probationary period from three years to five years and require a satisfactory performance rating, as demonstrated t
wonderful co author who is a professor of political science and political philosophy at harvard many years ago when we were both at princeton university we taught a course on ethics and public policy and that led to lescol offering several books on the deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, president gutmann, you give to legislative examples, 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> this is a tale of two compromises, and it begins with ronald reagan's presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us that live through the years recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat and ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bill bradley and bob packwood being a part of the movers of this compromise. fast forward to the affordable care act it was arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent c
can schedule an update with our behavioral sciences unit. i know that we've had -- they came before us. i know the chief has augmented that unite significantly. but we want to hear from them and see how things are going. i know we've had some issues within the department recently and we want to address that. >> also dr. gayle martin will be 7 and at scottish rights temple on february 8. he gives a fabulous case on suicide prevention and the stresses on law enforcement. >> president mazzucco: we did receive that e-mail today and it's open to the commissioners if you want to attend. we had a very good meeting with mary dunnigan's group and if we can have kelly dunn present. these are issues that involved the community and the department so i would like an update on that. >> i second that getting an update from the behavioral science unit because i remember last year we worked on this and we had a couple of recommendations. the chief was very supportive and i'm curious about how all of the recommendations have panned out, how it's been implemented. i definitely feel very sad for the offic
] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long t
and global warming but says the coverage is junk science? >> it is and very harmful. it tells us 5 million people will die every year because of global warming. they fail to say it has nothing to do with global warming. just the 3 million people was from indoor air pollution. if anything it is the opposite. lots of poor people in the third world burn cardboard or dong and they die from burning fat inside their houses. maybe give them cleaner fuels our fossil fuels there will be better. they tell us the wrong story and the wrong solution. john: the particulates kill people. global warming is theoretical. >> they say cut carbon emissions to help people dying from air pollution. no. don't burn down inside your house. we don't think of it because it was 100 years ago we had dirty fuels. john: in the west. but they pander to talk about the big storms caused by global warming. here is out for. >> this storm was related to global warming. the second ones in 100 years storm within 14 months. john: 2012 was below average the hurricanes go up and down. >> globally with hurricane energy index the low
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. queen mattresses start at just $699. and now save 50% on the closeout of our silver limited edition bed. ends sunday. >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about, where we focus on reporting from the front line, and we begin with an "outfront" update to a story we've been following. the army investigating another case of abuse at an army day care center in ft. meyer, virginia. the army, according to a spokesman, was notified yesterday that a child care worker allegedly slapped a child. the incident was reported by another caregiver in the room. the alleged perpetrator
to in infrastructure. we're investing half as much in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education -- state universities, for example, are being decima decimated. if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word. it became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about a sophisticated manner. some government, some private sector, some on their own and some jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as
about this law, because critics say it damages our ability to truly know, using serious science, the impact that guns have on public health and public safety, impeding research on gun safety, and preventing doctors from talking to patients about the potential health risks that come with gun ownership. add advocates who support the law say it protects the rights of gun owners. the national rifle association somehow managed to put this stealth legislation into president obama's health care reform bill. the question is how and why. and why, whatever you think of a law, one of the president's top allies, that's right, the president's ally, helped the nra get it passed. no surprise that there's a big dose of politics involved here. jim acosta tonight is keeping 'em honest. >> when president obama signed national health care reform into law, few in washington knew that buried in the legislation's more than 900 pages was a gift to the nation's powerful gun lobby. but here it is. a provision entitled "protection of second amendment rights." it states the government and health insurers c
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so mr. corrie inhold as you may know is shutting down some these pot clubs operating for years because of all the social problems. in portugal they have legalized drugs and had a lot of problems there in zurich they had to stop that. what do you think about that. >> this is america and a free country. the voters of colorado have spoken and we want to treat marijuana like alcohol that was what amendment 64 is all about. it is much safer to treat it that way in a regulated fashion and that's what we are doing. there are hundreds of thousands of alcohol clubs all over america. we are just like those except marijuana. >> bill: i'm wondering about the safer comment. i used to live in denver as you know. everybody has a car. mass transit very minor there in colorado. they go to your club 64. you don't sell marijuana there but you allow them to use. sit sit around and have little snacks i'm sure you sell. then they have to leave and go home and they are ston
? >> the science would say that alcohol is more detrimental. >> bill: one beer, one glass of wine because there are blood alcohol levels that you have to obey. one beer, one glass of wine as opposed to smoking a marijuana cigarette which they are going to do in your club. you don't see any difference? >> i would say it's about the same. >> bill: about the same. okay. >> it is. >> bill: i don't think you are going to get a lot of flack on that statement. in los angeles, medical marijuana clinics more than 200 of them have been closed down in the state of california i should say. a lot of them in l.a. the reason is that authorities said around these clinics with drug dealers. okay? because people who are in the drug culture, ie marijuana, then are a little bit -- have a little bit more tendency to use other drugs and that was attracting the dealers. also something that you don't have to worry about because you are not selling drugs at club 64. buying selling it to children. that was a big problem as well. but the culture that is being created by this intoxicant, marijuana does holland, port
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfortable. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. so it's not about keeping my dentures in, it's about keeping the food particles out. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're workinwith a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. >>> the u.s. military has a
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> our second story "outfront," football to blame. the national institutes of health says former nfl linebacker junior seau had a degenerative brain disease linked to multiple head traumas when he
.a. the new warning about an earthquake scenario that was once thought to be impossible. >> why a science teacher is being hailed a hero after a new school shooting in southern california. >> and what happened? the deadly accident that burned a bay area hillside and shut down a major traffic route at the peak of this morning's commute. >> i'm chief meteorologist jeff ranieri. the temperatures continue to drop into the 40s right now and one of the coldest nights in months coming our way. we'll talk about freeze warning and details how long it lasts coming up in a few minutes. [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still exposed to the dangers... of secondhand smoke... and some of them can't do anything about it. ♪ [ continues ] [ gasping ] >>> right now investigators are trying to figure out what caused a big rig to fly off an east bay freeway and burst into flames at the height of the morning commute. the accident killed the driver, william ballard of roseville
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
with a shotgun in a science classroom, wounding one student and leaving three others with minor injuries. another school shooting doesn't change the difficult politics of this issue. though biden's meeting came with a photo op. >> as an owner of shotguns, as a guy, i'm no great hunter, mostly skeet shooting for me. >> both the nra meeting and an evening meeting with the entertainment representatives pictured here were closed. during his movie, "django unchained" quentin tarantino with movies like "pulp fiction" refused to answer the question about the possibility of violent images. >> the vice president is talking to the people in the movie industry today about violence. >> and you know where i stand on it. >> which is that there is no relationship. >> yes. >> but you haven't said why you think there is no relationship. >> it's none of your damn business what i think about that. >> there you go. an arraignment hearing for james holmes, the shooter who killed 12 people and injured dozens more at a movie theatre in aurora, collapsed summer and claimed to be inspired by "batman's" joker is scheduled
, a science writer. c-span: was her name heineman? >> guest: christine russell. she kept her maiden name. my dad, then heineman started out in the public sector and ended his career working for generally let trick and now teaches in boston. c-span: this is the well-known then heineman. was this other also well-known? explain not. this is the first deadline this review, but how do they fit into the past? >> guest: i had a very -- my parents and my grandmother are amazing people and i feel very lucky. c-span: what did they do? >> guest: my grandfather was a self-made man. his father actually killed himself in 1929 after the stock rocket crash and was left alone to fend for his family. went to school, claimed his plan to law school and started out as a lawyer and started running northwest railroad and a number of other businesses in chicago. with very specific advisor to president johnson and i think my dad and i inherited a lot of their social believes and i carry a lot of that into the filmmaking i do for sure. c-span: by the decided dartmouth to study history? >> guest: i didn't know what el
exploitation, spreading its roots in science and technology around the world. and he had enemies here. his enemies with the southern segregation. the anti-imperialists, and the conservatives who said american fascists are those people who think wall street -- so he had enemies and those enemies want to get rid of him on the ticket in 1944. the big problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in chicago, potential voters who they want to run on vice president dick 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket or 2% said they wanted harry truman. the question was how was the party bosses going to support. roosevelt was very feeble. when party bosses are to come to them and they want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says to him, i support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough again. i am depending on you guys to do it. finally, caved in. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with them. every one of the rows of kids was furious with them. they were huge wallace supporters. he had all the black dele
in science today -- answers hidden in the cousins of cuba's painted snails. interpreter: cuba is known as the paradise of snails. many live here in this area and nowhere else. they have fascinated me since i was a student. and i like them because of their lifestyle -- so free, so relaxed, so interesting. narrator: in one of the most remote regions in cuba biologist emma palacios lemagne is cracking the mysteries of evolution. cuba doesn't provide emma with much money for her research and can't supply her with expensive equipment. but what cuba does give her is one of the most extraordinary laboratories on earth. instead of test tubes, emma uses mammoth limestone karsts called mogotes. centuries of erosion have carved them into towering island worlds a virtual galapagos, where, like darwin's finches emma's snails evolve in extreme isolation. the snails on these separated hills never venture more than 60 feet from home, making this the ideal place for emma to discover how their shapes, colors and behaviors are dictated by the land. interpreter: each slope on these mogot
fill with mud and a very sophisticated science you can reconstruct environmental histories going back in time. this is the 1920s and 1800's and look at past pollution levels preserved in the archive like a history book in the bottom of a lake. >> say that pollution levels right now are low, but you think they're going to go up over time but it strikes me even in the example you were just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many c
beeps] >> dr. mintz considers himself a pioneer in this gray area of law and science, and there are plenty of patients eager to follow the trail he's blazing. the ones we talked to in las vegas, all eager to remain young and vital, consider this a lifestyle choice, and they're prepared to roll the dice. you aren't concerned that five years from now, somebody might do a study and find out that this regimen accelerates the growth of cancer cells or causes diabetes? >> well, that's happened with prescriptive drugs. i mean, has it not? so this is any-- in any field you're doing this. they're taken drugs off the market because of this. >> so you'd rather feel better now while you're living your life than worry about the possibly downside 10 or 15 years from now? >> you could get killed on the interstate tomorrow. i mean, my goodness. i mean, it's-- you have to weigh risks and rewards. you do that every day in life. you do it when you get up in the morning. >> are you sure, are you absolutely positive, absent any scientific studies, that the treatments that you're giving no
it in the scientific literature by doing the good science and the studies to prove it. >> after bobby's accident, he got a desperate call from peter ghassimi, and after some explaining, asked him. >> what do you think about the idea of using high-dose fish oil like julian bales used with randy mccloy? [ applause ] the carbon monoxide level was really high. and i have no explanation of how i escaped it. >> but mccloy, whose remarkable recovery is well-known, was just one case. and it remains unclear whether omega 3 was truly the key. the next hurdle for ghassimi, convincing bobby's doctors. >> it was a fight. they didn't believe, and they said fine, the west virginia miner was one case. i need 1,000 cases to be proven for me before i can give this to your son. >> he literally had to lay down in the middle of the floor and throw a tantrum until they started to put the -- put it down his child's feeding tube. >> the tantrum worked. in two weeks after starting his fish oil regimen, bobby ghassimi, case study number two, began to emerge from his coma. >> woo! >> about two months after that, he attended h
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. hey america, even though they don't need one, wes, clay, and demarcus tried on the depend real fit briefs for charity to prove how great the fit is even while playing pro football. the best protection now looks, fits and feels just like underwear. get a free sample and try one on for yourself. [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette you celebrate a little win. nicorette gum helps calm your cravings and makes you less irritable. quit one cigarette at a time. >>> for those of you who have somehow managed to spend the last couple decades without seeing a "star wars" movie there is a group of die-hard fans to bring you up to speed in higher drive. >> luke we're going to have company. >> use the force, luke. >> reporter: folding chair, fighter jets. wiffle ball bats lightsabers. this is "star wars" all six of them on stage, low-fi in 60 minutes. >> we're cutting it up but with a lot of love. >> reporter: patrick gorman, the "star wars"
industry representative, says videos aren't the problems. >> what the science tells us is there is no causal link between imaginary violence in movies and books and video games, there is no causal link between imaginary violence and real life violence. >> reporter: reverend michael mcbride who met with biden with other religious leaders on wednesday says the white house encouraged them to reach out to their congregations. >> this is an opportunity for the faith community and for all americans to unite around the common pain of gun violence. >> reporter: white house officials say the vice president has offered to meet with families who are impacted by the tragedy in newtown. he has said he's aiming to get his proposals to the president by next tuesday. lester? >> kristen, thank you. >>> it's been three years to the day since the massive earthquake devastated parts of haiti. today, former president bill clinton attended a memorial service at a grave in which thousands were laid to rest. while some progress has been made, the suffering continues there on a vast scale. nbc'
depend on it. chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> we have more ahead on nbc bay area, a new screening test that will detect one of the hardest to detect cancers in women. >> and at 6:00, a man in prison for more than a decade after stealing $100,000 worth of merchandise from a store, he is now free and how he is making the most of his second chance. >> remember to layer. see you at 6:00. >> it will be cold. >>> on our broadcast tonight, in the fight. one american city has now declared a full-on flu emergency as deaths from the illness increase and hospitals try to keep up. early detection. big new hope tonight in the fight against ovarian cancer. the deadliest form for women. there has been a big development. >>> rules of the road. how far can police officers go when they pull you over? the story could have a big impact for allf us on the road. >>> and fallen stars. lance armstrong set to open up to oprah as the hall of fame door is shut on some baseball greats tainted by the steroid controversy. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, th
already get routinely. our report tonight from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: the experimental test could revolutionize early detections for two major women's cancers. uterine, which kills 8,000 women a year in this country. and ovarian, which kills 15,000. >> this has the potential to fill in a niche where there is no effective screening test. >> reporter: linda defino has stage 3 ovarian cancer. doctors found it only because she felt a fullness in her abdomen, a symptom women often ignore. >> i started to feel this strange feeling that i just knew wasn't right. >> reporter: she is undergoing 18 weeks of chemotherapy. doctors have long been searching for a test to find ovarian cancer early, when it is far more easily treated. >> when ovarian cancer is found at stage 1, the cure rate is 85 to 90%. >> reporter: to develop the new test, the scientists at johns hopkins started with a familiar pap smear that looks for abnormal cells that become cervical cancer. the pap test has saved millions of lives around the world. the hopkins researchers found that cancerous
is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help you much, is it? >
. there was an outcry provoked by this horrific crime. in a new delhi suburb, science of how slow change may be. the authorities and their attitudes -- signs of how slow change may be. another woman was found dead after a suspected gang rape. she was going home from her job at a factory. when her father reported her missing, police did not listen. >> they were rude and said she had probably gone off with a man. do not worry, she will come back. >> another family grieving now. many ask if things will really change it when the ander dies down -- anger dies down. >> there is a heavy police presence in belfast after violent protests involving children as young as 10. the disturbance was sparked by the decision to limit the number of days the union flag flies over city hall. dozens of police officers have been injured. our correspondent has sent us the latest. >> the main route through east belfast looks like a battleground. pilots for the fifth consecutive night. -- riots for the fifth consecutive night. the protest target five weeks ago. there is no end in sight. political leaders are well aware o
line that is -- has filled, science fiction novels. there's more to the script. there are 17 billion planets similar to earth in our galaxy. could the similarities mean that any of those could support life? a short time ago i discussed that with theoretical physicist michio kaku. >> this is a game changer. one out of six stars that you see a night could have an earth- like planet going around it. somebody could be looking back at us from our space. >> what are the chances that they are? some of these planets circulating might have the possibility of supporting life? >> to be fair, most of the earth-size planets probably have no more than microbial life like germs and seaweed. a few of them might have intelligent life. dna has been around for about $3.50 -- 3.5 billion years. only in the last five runners thousand years as intelligent life risen out of this one. you cannot rule out intelligent life. quex in 2011, astronomers said they had found two earth sized planets. now it is billions. >> they have taken a census of the milky way galaxy. 50% of all stars have some kind of planet go
back to some older political science about the presidential power. there is one from richard newstat of the politics of persuasion and the bully pulpit, which the president has not used. he can go offcongress and directly to the markets and the american public and make a case of the use of the unconstitutional and the seemingly unconstitutional authority, and he has not done that yet, and that is one of the options of the perceived power. >> and it feels to me, like, christina, not only could he potentially go, but that one of the arguments in the back pocket is that we are not actually having a deficit crisis. much of the deficit is already addressed, and so in other words, sort of when we look at the trend lines that paul krueger has been showing us the trend lines are showing that the deficit is disappearing slowly but surely, and most of it on spending cuts and is there a need, because when you see how much has been done and as you look at the graph, and how much has been done on spending cuts, do we indeed need to have this fight? >> well, do we need to. and initially we saw oba
their ideology, their theology, their learning, their science and exploration. and it was really a convenient place for learning. it still is today. we trace our history back to 1753, when the library company formed by the merchants and the men of the day to form a library greater than any one individual could. they did that in order to share resources and at that time the city was growing and they wanted to make that information available to all. so, the providence library company exists in many places throughout the city, often being at the seat of town government and they purchased their materials from england. their original collection was about 345 titles and they unfortunately had a tragic event in the late 1700's where there is a fire on christmas eve and out of those 345 titles they originally purchased they lost many in the fire. except for 70 there were still in circulation. we actually have some of that founding collection. what's really and just adjusting is they had the foresight to make a notation so that the new they were following the original founding collection and as it the
if it interferes with pleasure or other functions. christian science believes the children should not be taken into the doctor when they're ill is reported to successfully so that has led to an abuse. >> what is going on? is there a substantial burden so otherwise does it justify the invitation? burqa but since it is not irreversible and does not impair other bodily functions. if it is physical or sexual violence then it should be legally punished. of the rise it is in the same category of other requirements that has the unpleasant to parents put on their children. some appear to violate laws against child safety that is when yale professor admitted in her book with tiger mother she forced her daughter to stand outside in the cold without supper and also at the piano without faster access because she did not master a difficult passage of piano work was a child abuse and one wondered why the police were not on her doorstep but the answer was obvious. but that is the sort of thing to intervene. similar tactics could be used to get the girl to wear burqa it is more emotional blackmail like my fat
. the science of becoming clearer that alternative energy like solar and wind will not be that effective. if you look at the solar stock index from the time obama was first elected it is down 95%. >> we have been hearing this a long time. not just the president has been talking about it but a lot of other people. people are not going wow i'm getting rich on this green job. >> people are struggleing to find jobs. the answer will be in efficiency. making buildings, cars more efficient, pollution control. those are more do-able. why do i keep mentioning president obama? i am a moderate guy. he has done more executive orders, circumvented congress to do what he wants. now that he doesn't have to worry about reelection i believe that president obama whether you like him or not, he will do lots of things. as i look at my crystal ball i am looking at the things that are implications of what president obama has done and promised will do. >> let's go to college. suppose you have a rising senior or junior in your family. you are hoping you can afford to send the person to college. if you can maybe he/she
and it is a science fiction work in which amphibian's take over the world. they are too clever for the human. they will show that they can also be clever about their elected officials. >> former on the presidential race in the czech republic, we are joined by our eastern europe correspondent to just came back from the czech republic. thank you for joining us. this is the first time people can directly elect the president. is this changing things? >> the new president will have more to say because he will be directly elected by the people. maybe he can be something like a moderator in this very different political scene. we have not seen much in the government that were able to and a regular term in office. there are social democrats on the one side and then the conservatives on the other. it is a very difficult, political scene. >> there is a wide field of candidates. >> the former prime minister who form the social democratic party in the 1990's is leading the opinion polls. he is quite a character, charming, humorous. he is very different than the other potential favorite, also a former pr
combination of the science, arts and the culture and the urban green space which is essentially non existent in the city where i was being recruited to, and this combination is really uniquely priceless, and i hope you preserve it at all costs. the project we have here in dispute today -- i'm not objecting to the project. what i am objecting to is the scope of the project, and i think this will significantly impact our quality of life. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker please in support of the dr. >> good afternoon. my name is [inaudible]. i am one of the co-owners of the house adjacent to the project in question and i am here to voice my concerns. when i came to san francisco nine years ago to pursue my career as a researcher and physician at [inaudible] i was driven by the desire to live in one of the most progressive cities in the country. i think san francisco stands for innovation progress, all things smart, smartphones, smart car, so what about smart living? and i think san francisco should be all about new ideas, about efficient use of space, about
, but -- galileo academy of science and technology. we are so very proud of you today. wherever you go, let the young people know from -- to city hall, that you have arrived today. let them know where you went to school today so they can have hope. my younger sisters, cohen, kim, you're always there. where's the opera house? we thank you. hbcu. that makes my heart happy. this commissioners would not be sitting here today, former commissioner mar, former commissioner jane kim, now supervisor. former commissioner norman yee. no supervisor. you give our people hope. i will say that malia cohen, would be the next president of the board of supervisors. supervisor kennedy and doris ward, they showed you what to do. good luck and god bless each of you. >> my name is michael -- i want to say welcome to the class of 2013. congratulations for making yourself available and here at city hall. second, i want to point out that two of the nominees need to have a legislative aide if they will be board president, if malia cohen and jane jim would need a third legislative aide. second, all three of the c
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
alameda creek filter gallery project, with environmental science associates to provide environmental analysis services and permitting support; and authorize the general manager to execute this amendment with a time extension of six years, for a total agreement of duration of eight years, 10 months. >> [speaker not understood]. good afternoon, commissioners. tm kelly. this project, the alameda creek, per alameda creek filter gallery project is located in [speaker not understood] on alameda creek. it is to recapture water that is released for fisheries, habitat enhancement from the calaveras dam. the project started in january 2010, then it was placed on hold for -- since november 2011, basically two years. and now we are ready, almost ready. the planning has been going on to plan the project and we're almost ready to start environmental review again, but we don't have enough time. so, therefore, we're asking for a three-year, five-month extension. there was a slight error in the agenda item under amendment number 1. if you look at that, it says extension by sick years. >> yes. >> but
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
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